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Dancing Bologna

August 18th, 2007

I just ran across an article that I have to share, the Last Dance of the Web Bolognanew window. What is Web bologna you might ask? According to Dan Century, the name given for the witty young man who wrote this article, it’s “superfluous and garish web design elements that marketing departments love, but the average customer will ultimately loathe.”

Like spam, Web bologna is a different type of intellectually insulting processed product that we get served up on occasion whether we ask for it or not. But instead of coming through email it comes at us from the pages of web sites.

Now in Dan’s definition of Web bologna, he says that “marketing departments love” it. I’m not sure what marketing departments he’s talking about, but I can guarantee that this marketing department is top on the list of bologna loathers. As a matter of fact, I’ve recently vented my disgust of a newer evolution of Web bologna (the “Site Pal”) on this blog.

I think a key principle of life that applies to this topic is that just because something can be done, does not mean it should be done…e.g. if one can belch one’s name, that does not mean that it’s a good idea to do so when meeting potential customers.

So aside from just being plain cheesy, what’s so bad about bologna? It’s bad because it exists on the opposite side of the spectrum from good usability—the design principles that have been researched and proven to facilitate visitors to your site becoming customers. In other words, bologna takes away from the whole purpose for a business to have Web site. As a side note, to learn all you need to know about usability, pick up a copy of Steve Krug’s classic book, Don’t Make Me Think.

I encourage you to take a read through Dan’s humorous article. While much of the bologna Dan mentions in his article is extreme and from the past Internet era, the same misguided mindset of “this looks cool, we should put it on our Web page” still exists today with newer technology and tactics.

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